The Importance of Egg Shells to a Farmer

By Karamagi Ednah
Information got during the monthly CELAC Luwero District Farmers Network forum

Do not throw away your eggs shells after eating the inner content! Use it as a fertilizer for your farm crop”. This is what I learnt from a farmer during the farmers monthly forum in August this year.

The outer covering of an egg, that is the egg shell, is composed of 93% Calcium Carbonate. In addition to the calcium, it contains about 1% nitrogen, about a ½% phosphoric acid, and other trace elements that make them a practical fertilizer. Egg shells may be white or brown depending on the breed of chicken. Either way, the color does not affect egg quality, flavor, cooking characteristics, nutritive value or shell thickness. It is accepted practice for egg shells to be dried and used as a source of calcium in animal feeds

The farmers went on to say that calcium is an essential plant nutrient which plays a fundamental part in cell manufacture and growth. They also said that most roots must have some calcium at the growing tips especially since plant growth removes large quantities of calcium from the soil; an ideal way to replace it being through recycling egg shells.

This they do by sun drying them and then crushing them to powder form; after which they are placed around the crop. They said that this kind of farming also prevents the snails from eating the crops like cabbages.

Also, they said one can mix the powder egg shells with dried coffee grounds to form a fertilizer for the crops.

One interesting aspect is that they did not go to school to learn this method. It was after realization that when egg shells are used as a decoration in potted plants, the plant grows very well. This prompted further research from their district agricultural officers who then told them the value of the egg shells to the plant.

About these ads

4 responses to this post.

  1. Posted by Margo on November 21, 2008 at 3:40 am

    I am trying to figure out a way to dry the shells out, it is winter and I get 14 dozen per week from a bakery. I want to use them on the garden, but need some ideas that are energy efficient. maybe crushing them fresh and putting in a vinegar solution in a large barrel. THe acid will disolve them eventually I think

    Reply

  2. Posted by niño emocling on October 12, 2009 at 1:13 pm

    ,,we will have a study about the EEFECTIVENESS OF EGG SHELLS AS PLANT FERTILIZERS……….what can you suggest?

    Reply

  3. Posted by abdullahi quadri on December 13, 2013 at 10:10 pm

    nice-one

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

%d bloggers like this: